Watch/Read/Travel: Rudi Arapahoe

October 20, 2016

Neo-noir and erotic thriller. In the neo-noir, everybody has a clear role, a face to wear. The antihero, femme fatal, hapless best friend, victim – all ensnared in a desperate situation, navigating bankrupt morality. For me, it started with Polanski’s China Town, then came Eyes Wide Shut, Lost Highway, Body Heat… In time, I found myself descending into fog. Brian De Palma took me by the hand into Body Double, Dressed to Kill… And then in a dry gasp, I find myself catching a whiff of Alice Harford’s exquisite perfume on Catherine Tramell; the lines between Steven Taylor and Nicholas Van Orton muddying; and Bergman’s Persona blurring with Lynch’s Mulholland Drive… Fleeting moments from the masterpieces are somehow evoked in the lesser films as they mix together, fashioning a strangely pleasant neural stew.

Watch

The Divided Self (R.D. Laing 1960). It’s extraordinary to think that Laing penned The Divided Self in 1960, the work significantly predates the notion of person-centred care in psychiatry. It’s a beautiful book that moves deftly between philosophy, sharp clinical observation and poetry. It’s here that Laing first posited the notion of False Selves. I first encountered The Divided Self as a Psychology undergraduate student. Shortly after I read it, my housemate developed schizophrenia; I decided not to pursue a career as a Psychologist.

Read

Travel. When we travel, it’s almost irresistible to step ahead, virtually walk the streets or learn from traveller who has predated us about how a particular hotel in Japan folds a paper crane on your pillow. I seldom really travel.

Travel

(Rudi Arapahoe)


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